How To Use A FREE PPC Spy Tool To Legally Hijack Keywords And Make Money Out Of Ittitle=

How To Use A FREE PPC Spy Tool To Legally Hijack Keywords And Make Money Out Of It

Tweet What I’m going to reveal is a very recent legal tactic that will enable anybody to simple  copy the exact keywords people are using in their PPC campaigns and how you can benefit from it and make money. Surprisingly, you need a simple FREE  PPC Spy too called – PPC Web Spy I’ll show […]

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Mar 2009

17

Use Takeaway Selling to Increase the Urgency

When you limit the supply of a product or service in some way (i.e. takeaway selling), basic economics dictates that the demand will rise. In other words, people will generally respond better to an offer if they believe the offer is about to become unavailable or restricted in some way.

And of course, the opposite is also true. If a prospect knows your product will be around whenever he needs it, there’s no need for him to act now. And when your ad is put aside by the prospect, the chance of closing the sale diminishes greatly.

It’s your job, therefore, to get your prospect to buy, and buy now. Using scarcity to sell is a great way to accomplish that.

There are basically three types of takeaways:

1)    Limiting the quantity
2)    Limiting the time
3)    Limiting the offer

In the first method, limiting the quantity, you are presenting a fixed number of widgets available for sale. After they’re gone, that’s it.

Some good ways to limit the quantity include:

•  only so many units made or obtained
•    selling off old stock to make room for new
•    limited number of cosmetically-defected items, or a fire sale
•    only a limited number being sold so as not to saturate the market
•    etc.

In the second method, limiting the time, a deadline is added to the offer. It should be a realistic deadline, not one that changes all the time (especially on a website, where the deadline date always seems to be that very day at midnight…when you return the next day, the deadline date has mysteriously changed again to the new day). Deadlines that change decrease your credibility.

This approach works well when the offer or the price will change, or the product/service will become unavailable, after the deadline.

The third method, limiting the offer, is accomplished by limiting other parts of the offer, such as the guarantee, bonuses or premiums, the price, and so on.

When using takeaway selling, you must be sure to follow-through with your restrictions. If you say you only have 500 widgets to sell, then don’t sell 501. If you say your offer will expire at the end of the month, make sure it does. Otherwise your credibility will take a hit. Prospects will remember the next time another offer from you makes its way into their hands.

Another important thing you should do is explain the reason why the offer is being restricted. Don’t just say the price will be going up in three weeks, but decline to tell them why.

Here are some examples of good takeaway selling:

“Unfortunately, I can only handle so many clients. Once my plate is full, I will be unable to accept any new business. So if you’re serious about strengthening your investment strategies and creating more wealth than ever before, you should contact me ASAP.”

“Remember…you must act by [date] at midnight in order to get my 2 bonuses. These bonuses have been provided by [third-party company], and we have no control over their availability after that time.”

“We’ve obtained only 750 of these premiums from our vendor. Once they are gone, we won’t be able to get any more until next year. And even then we can’t guarantee the price will remain the same. In fact, because of the increasing demand, it’s very likely the price could double or triple by then!”

Remember when I said earlier that people buy based on emotions, then back up their decision to buy with logic? Well, by using takeaway selling, that restriction becomes part of that logic to buy and buy now.

Popularity: 30% [?]


Mar 2009

15

Google has launched it interest based advertising.     What it does is google “tracks” your interest and show’s you ads releated to your interests.

Say, if you often visit a sports blog,  google would be able to track this via putting a “cookie” on your computer (using your browser) and then you will be able to see google ads related to your interests.

For some people, this might be obtrusive so google has this opt-out page for users so google won’t “track” their interest.  But I guess if you delete all your browser’s “cookies” you will still be tracked. (just a hunch).

In the eyes of advertisers, these would really make sense.  Just imagine, they can now be able to target the right people for their products.  It is no use displaying baseball accessories to people who do not like baseball.  But it makes perfect sense for advertisers to show baseball related products/ads to baseball fanatics, even if they are visiting non-baseball related websites.

Popularity: 12% [?]


Mar 2009

15

The Structure of AIDAS

There’s a well-known structure in successful sales letters, described by the acronym AIDA.

AIDA stands for:

•    Attention
•    Interest
•    Desire
•    Action

First, you capture your prospect’s attention. This is done with your headline and lead. If your ad fails to capture your prospect’s attention, it fails completely. Your prospect doesn’t read your stellar copy, and doesn’t order your product or service.

Then you want to build a strong interest in your prospect. You want him to keep reading, because if he reads, he just might buy.

Next, you channel a desire. Having a targeted market for this is key, because you’re not trying to create a desire where one did not already exist. You want to capitalize on an existing desire, which your prospect may or may not know he already has. And you want your prospect to experience that desire for your product or service.

Finally, you present a call to action. You want him to pick up the telephone, return the reply card, attend the sales presentation, order your product, whatever. You need to ask for the sale (or response, if that’s the goal). You don’t want to beat around the bush at this point. If your letter and AIDA structure is sound and persuasive, here’s where you present the terms of your offer and urge the prospect to act now.

A lot has been written about the AIDA copywriting formula. I’d like to add one more letter to the acronym: S for Satisfy.

In the end, after the sale is made, you want to satisfy your prospect, who is now a customer. You want to deliver exactly what you promised (or even more), by the date you promised, in the manner you promised. In short, you want to give him every reason in the world to trust you the next time you sell him a back-end offer. And of course you’d rather he doesn’t return the product (although if he does, you also execute your return policy as promised).

Either way, you want your customers to be satisfied. It will make you a lot more money in the long run.

Popularity: 10% [?]


Feb 2009

27

I’m sure you’ve heard recently about PPC Classroom – yes, you can get it
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free, it doesn’t get better than that!

Or…I thought until I got an e-mail from Anik last night…

Anik & Amit somehow convinced some of the TOP marketers in the world to
actually help their students in a BIG way.

They have convinced some of the BEST tools & courses to be given away for Free
as well in addition to PPC Classroom…

So, you get $3,197 worth of Bonuses that are for SALE otherwise. This is not some “re-sell” junk — these are AMAZING tools you’re going to need anyways…

Have a look:

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Here’s a briefing of it…

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3. Howie Schwartz – Workshop Recordings ($1,000)
4. Emil Paz – PPC Bully – 2 Months Free ($98)
5. Jay Stockwell – SpeedPPC – 2 Months Free ($397)
6. Steven Juth – AdwordAccelerator – 2 Months Free ($74)
7. Chris Carpenter – Google Cash v4 ($67)
8. Cody Moya – 750 Traffic Tactics ($397)
9. Greg Cesar – Exclusive CPA + PPC Interview ($97)
10. Kabita Kalita – CPA PPC Niche Magic ($97)
11. Kirt Christensen – Entire DVD on PPC ($97)
12. Paul Colligan – LIVE PPV Webinar ($197)
13. Jim Morris – NicheBot ($382 Credits)

Total: $3,197

That’s over $3,197 of amazing courses AND TOOLS. Trust me, you’ll end up spending on these tools anyways if you go outside of this offer…

At this point, PPC Classroom is worth it JUST for the tools alone! You’d be crazy to miss out on this – I’m dead serious.

Go now and get ALL this for F.R.E.E – You just pay S&H on a DVD…

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Check It Out!

Popularity: 12% [?]


Feb 2009

27

Write To Be Scanned

Your layout is very important in a sales letter, because you want your letter to look inviting, refreshing to the eyes. In short, you want your prospect to stop what he’s doing and read your letter.

If he sees a letter with tiny margins, no indentations, no breaks in the text, no white space, and no subheads…if he sees a page of nothing but densely-packed words, do you think he’ll be tempted to read it?

Not likely.

If you do have ample white space and generous margins, short sentences, short paragraphs, subheads, and an italicized or underlined word here and there for emphasis, it will certainly look more inviting to read.

When reading your letter, some prospects will start at the beginning and read word for word. Some will read the headline and maybe the lead, then read the “P.S.” at the end of the letter and see who the letter is from, then start from the beginning.

And some folks will scan through your letter, noticing the various subheads strategically positioned by you throughout your letter, then decide if it’s worth their time to read the entire thing. Some may never read the entire letter, but order anyways.

You must write for all of them. Interesting and compelling long copy for the studious reader, and short paragraphs and sentences, white space, and subheads for the skimmer.

Subheads are the smaller headlines sprinkled throughout your copy.

When coming up with your headline, some of the headlines that didn’t make the cut can make great subheads. A good subhead forces your prospect to keep reading, threading him along from start to finish throughout your copy, while also providing the glue necessary to keep skimmers skimming.

Popularity: 13% [?]


Feb 2009

25

The More You Tell, The More You Sell

The debate on using long copy versus short copy never seems to end. Usually it is a newcomer to copywriting who seems to think that long copy is boring and, well…long. “I would never read that much copy,” they say.

The fact of the matter is that all things being equal, long copy will outperform short copy every time. And when I say long copy, I don’t mean long and boring, or long and untargeted.

The person who says he would never read all that copy is making a big mistaking in copywriting: he is going with his gut reaction instead of relying on test results. He is thinking that he himself is the prospect. He’s not. We’re never our own prospects.

There have been many studies and split tests conducted on the long copy versus short copy debate. And the clear winner is always long copy. But that’s targeted relevant long copy as opposed to untargeted boring long copy.

Some significant research has found that readership tends to fall off dramatically at around 300 words, but does not drop off again until around 3,000 words.

If I’m selling an expensive set of golf clubs and send my long copy to a person who’s plays golf occasionally, or always wanted to try golf, I am sending my sales pitch to the wrong prospect. It is not targeted effectively. And so if a person who receives my long copy doesn’t read past the 300th word, they weren’t qualified for my offer in the first place.

It wouldn’t have mattered whether they read up to the 100th word or 10,000th word. They still wouldn’t have made a purchase.

However, if I sent my long copy to an avid die-hard golfer, who just recently purchased other expensive golf products through the mail, painting an irresistible offer, telling him how my clubs will knock 10 strokes off his game, he’ll likely read every word. And if I’ve targeted my message correctly, he will buy.

Remember, if your prospect is 3000 miles away, it’s not easy for him to ask you a question. You must anticipate and answer all of his questions and overcome all objections in your copy if you are to be successful.

And make sure you don’t throw everything you can think of under the sun in there. You only need to include as much information as you need to make the sale…and not one word more.

If it takes a 10-page sales letter, so be it. If it takes a 16-page magalog, fine. But if the 10-page sales letter tests better than the 16-page magalog, then by all means go with the winner.

Does that mean every prospect must read every word of your copy before he will order your product? Of course not.

Some will read every word and then go back and reread it again. Some will read the headline and lead, then skim much of the body and land on the close. Some will scan the entire body, then go back and read it. All of those prospects may end up purchasing the offer, but they also all may have different styles of reading and skimming

Popularity: 11% [?]

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